Archives for October 2010

The fate of all explanation

The fate of all explanation is to close one door only to have another fly wide open.

Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p30 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Nothing is unique

After commenting on black rains in Ireland in 1849, 1887, 1898 and 1907, Fort writes:

“Our Intermediatist principle of pseudo-logic, or our principle of Continuity is, of course, that nothing is unique, or individual: that all phenomena merge away into all other phenomena: that, for instance–suppose there should be vast celestial super-oceanic, or inter-planetary vessels that come near this earth and discharge volumes of smoke at times. We’re only supposing such a thing as that now, because, conventionally, we are beginning modestly and tentatively. But if it were so, there would necessarily be some phenomenon upon this earth, with which that phenomenon would merge. Extra-mundane smoke and smoke from cities merge, or both would manifest in black precipitations in rain.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, pp27-28 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

An existence that is essentially Hibernian

On Sept. 4, 1851, Rev. W. Read, a “diligent observer” for 28 years with a high quality telescope, saw a host of self-luminous bodies, moving at different speeds. He observed these bodies, which mostly moved east to west, for six hours. They occupied a zone of several degrees in breadth, in the field of his telescope. Two other members of his family also witnessed the objects, according to letters in the Monthly Notices of the R. A. S., 11-48 and 12-38.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p218 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

As to free will and intermediatism

As to free will and Intermediatism–same answer as to everything else. By free will we mean Independence–or that which does not merge away into something else–so, in Intermediateness, neither free-will nor slave-will–but a different approximation for every so-called person toward one or the other of the extremes. The hackneyed way of expressing this seems to me to be the acceptable way, if in Intermediateness, there is only the paradoxical: that we’re free to do what we have to do.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, pp212-213 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A super-Zeppelin

On August 9, 1762, M. de Rostan of Basle, France, as recorded in the Annual Register, 9-120, observed a “vast, spindle-shaped body” while taking altitudes of the sun. It advanced slowly across the disk of the sun, and was “about three of the sun’s digits in breadth and nine in length.” The object did not disappear until September 7, when it “reached the sun’s limb.” M. Croste, at Sole, a distance of “forty-five German leagues northward from Lausanne,” also described the object.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p199 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).