Archives for December 2010

The end of the world

According to the Monthly Weather Review, 32-522, a period of intense darkness occurred in Memphis, Tenn., for about fifteen minutes at 10 a.m. on Dec. 2, 1904. “‘We are told,’” Fort quotes, “’that in some quarters a panic prevailed, and that some were shouting and praying and imagining that the end of the world had come.’”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p233 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Take the Super-Sargasso Sea into full acceptance

At Poorhundur, India, on Dec. 11, 1854, flat pieces of ice, “‘large ice flakes,’” many of them weighing several pounds, fell from the sky (Report of the British Association, 1855-37).

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p187 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A silence upon the part of scientific men that is unusual

A lump of ice weighing four pounds fell in Texas on Dc. 6, 1893 (Scientific American, 68-58).

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p185 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Dislodged by storms

A triangular cloud appeared in a storm on Dec. 17, 1852, according to the London Roy. Soc. Proc., 6-276. It was about half the apparent diameter of the moon, and had a red nucleus and a long tail. It was visible for 13 minutes before the nucleus exploded.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p101 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

To be fair is to have no opinion at all

According to Notes and Queries, 8-6-104, lizards fell on the sidewalks of Montreal, Canada, on Dec. 28, 1857.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p93 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).