On the tops of haystacks

On July 25, 1850, at Rajkote, India, according to All the Year Round, 8-255, after one of the heaviest rainfalls on record, the ground was found “literally covered with fishes.” Apparently some of the fish were found on “the tops of haystacks.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 87 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Anybody who lost a pond would be heard from

Fort records that on July 30, 1838, according to Notes and Queries (8-7-437), little frogs were found in London after a heavy storm. The explanation for such phenomenon is that the frogs were scooped up by a whirlwind. His commentary: “In the exclusionist-imagination there is no regard for mud, debris from the bottom of a pond, floating vegetation, loose things from the shores–but a precise picking out of frogs only. Of all instances I have that attribute the fall of small frogs or toads to whirlwinds, only one definitely identifies or places the whirlwind. Also, as has been said before, a pond going up would be quite as interesting as frogs coming down. Whirlwinds we read of over and over–but where and what whirlwind? It seems to me that anybody who had lost a pond would be heard from.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 82-83 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Seventeen tiny coffins

The London Times, in its July 20, 1836 edition, as well as the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquarians of Scotland, 3-12-460, reported that boys searching for rabbits’ burrows at Arthur’s Seat near Edinburgh found some thin sheets of slate in the side of a cliff. When they pulled them out, they found a little cave, within which were seventeen tiny coffins, three or four inches long. Inside the coffins were miniature wooden figures, each dressed differently.

The coffins had been “deposited singly…and at intervals of many years.” The older ones, in a bottom tier of eight, were “quite decayed, and the wrappings had moldered away.” The middle tier, also of eight coffins, did not appear quite as old, while the one on top, starting a new tier, was “quite recent-looking.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 169 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Burning bituminous matter

During a thunderstorm in July 1681 near Cape Cod, “burning, bituminous matter” fell on the deck of the English ship Albemarle, according to the Edin. New Phil. Jour., 26-86.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 74 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Rhythm of reassurances

During a storm, a brownish substance fell at Luchon on July 28, 1885. It was “very friable, carbonaceous matter” than when burned, “gave out a resinous odor.” From Comptes Rendus, 103-837.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 74 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).