Vast gelatinous areas aloft

In a rainstorm in Wilna, Lithuania, on April 4, 1846, nut-sized masses of a resinous and gelatinous substance fell, according to Comptes Rendus, 23-542. It was “odorless until burned: then it spread a very pronounced sweetish odor.” It was firmer than “gelatine,” but when in water for 24 hours, it “swelled out, and looked altogether gelatinous.” A similar substance fell in Asia Minor in 1841 and 1846.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 47-48 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Leave it to later developers of super-geography

In February, 1841, an oily, reddish matter fell at Genoa, according to Comptes Rendus, 13-215.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 64 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

The mystery of the local sky

Comrie, Perthshire, England, was subject to a strange phenomenon from 1839 to 1841. Throughout the month of October 1839 in particular, a series of “shocks” were felt, some slight, some severe. The noise was described as “‘like distant thunder or reports of artillery, …sometimes high in the air, and was often heard without any sensible shock.’” The most violent quake occurred, according to the Edin. New Phil. Jour., vol. 32, on October 23. Various people in the vicinity reported that the sounds seemed to come from high in the air rather than underground. According to that same journal, 32-107, there were 247 occurrences of these sounds between Oct. 3, 1839 and Feb. 14, 1841.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, pp.404-405 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A sanitarium for overworked coincidences

At Dunfermline, as noted in the London Times, Oct. 12, 1841, many several-inch-long fishes fell in a thunderstorm on Oct. 7, 1841.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p184 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).