Anybody who lost a pond would be heard from

Fort records that on July 30, 1838, according to Notes and Queries (8-7-437), little frogs were found in London after a heavy storm. The explanation for such phenomenon is that the frogs were scooped up by a whirlwind. His commentary: “In the exclusionist-imagination there is no regard for mud, debris from the bottom of a pond, floating vegetation, loose things from the shores–but a precise picking out of frogs only. Of all instances I have that attribute the fall of small frogs or toads to whirlwinds, only one definitely identifies or places the whirlwind. Also, as has been said before, a pond going up would be quite as interesting as frogs coming down. Whirlwinds we read of over and over–but where and what whirlwind? It seems to me that anybody who had lost a pond would be heard from.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 82-83 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

There in the first place?

“I’d like to emphasize something that I am permitted to see because I am still primitive or intelligent or in a state of maladjustment:

"That there is not one report findable of a fall of tadpoles from the sky.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 81 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974)