Debris from inter-planetary disasters

On Dec. 19, 1903, a rain of lavender-colored substance fell at Oudon, France, according to Bull. Soc. Met. de France, 1904-124.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p39 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Covered the ground completely

The Literary Digest of Sept. 2, 1921 published a letter from Carl G. Gowman of Detroit, Michigan, relating a fall from the sky of a substance resembling blood in southwest China on Nov. 17 (1920?). “It fell upon three villages close together, and was said to have fallen somewhere else forty miles away.” In one of the villages, the substance “‘covered the ground completely’”, and was found on roofs and the ground. The spots “did not dissolve in several subsequent rains,” and that “nothing was in bloom” at the time, so it was not pollen.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p524 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Covered the ground completely

The Literary Digest of Sept. 2, 1921 published a letter from Carl G. Gowman of Detroit, Michigan, relating a fall from the sky of a substance resembling blood in southwest China on Nov. 17 (1920?). “It fell upon three villages close together, and was said to have fallen somewhere else forty miles away.” In one of the villages, the substance “‘covered the ground completely’”, and was found on roofs and the ground. The spots “did not dissolve in several subsequent rains,” and that “nothing was in bloom” at the time, so it was not pollen.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p524 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A great quantity of corpuscles

Fort quotes a story in Comptes Rendus, 23-832, about a tremendous red rain in France, Oct. 16 and 17, 1846. The explanation was that the rain was colored by matter swept up from the earth’s surface and then precipitated. But a later issue of the journal, 24-625, described the rain as “so vividly red and so blood-like that many persons in France were terrified.” A chemist who analyzed the matter noted “a great quantity of corpuscles–whether blood-like corpuscles or not,” while another set down organic matter at 35%.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p251 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

The Super-Sargasso Sea and its Arctic region

Fort writes of an item in the Monthly Weather Review for October 1886, quoted from the Charlotte Chronicle. “For three weeks there had been a fall of water from the sky, in Charlotte, N.C., localized in one particular spot, every afternoon, about three o’clock; that, whether the sky was cloudy or cloudless, the water or rain fell upon a small patch of land between two trees and nowhere else.”

Fort goes on to note that a Signal Service observer visited the place, near two trees at the corner of 9th and D streets. The observer “saw precipitation in the form of rain drops at 4:47 and 4:55 p.m., while the sun was shining brightly. On the 22nd, I again visited the place, and from 4:05 to 4:25 p.m., a light shower of rain fell from a cloudless sky…Sometimes the precipitation falls over an area of half an acre, but always appears to center at these two trees, and when lightest occurs there only.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, pp191-192 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).