An unknown grain

A fall of grain occurred during a thunderstorm on March 24, 1840, at Rajkit, India, according to Col. Sykes of the British Association in American Journal of Science, 1841-40. The natives were excited, “because it was grain of a kind unknown to them.” Botanists were unable to identify it as well.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 66 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Some were much larger than others

The Jour. Asiatic Soc. of Bengal, 2-650, and the Amer. Jour. Sci., 1-32-199, record a fall of fishes near Feridpoor, India, on Feb. 19, 1830. They were of varying sizes. Some were “whole and fresh,” while others were “mutilated and putrefying.”

In witness depositions, some fish were reported as fresh, while others were “stinking and headless.”

Some of the fish weighed 1 ½ pounds each, while others were as much as 3 pounds.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 87-88 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Between Venus and Mars

On Jan. 22, 1898, according to Jour. Leeds Astro. Soc., 1906-23, Lieut. Blackett of the Royal Navy saw an unknown body between Venus and Mars during a total eclipse of the sun. He was assisting Sir Norman Lockyer at Viziadrug, India.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p. 489 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Take the Super-Sargasso Sea into full acceptance

At Poorhundur, India, on Dec. 11, 1854, flat pieces of ice, “‘large ice flakes,’” many of them weighing several pounds, fell from the sky (Report of the British Association, 1855-37).

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p187 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

There was no longer doubt

According to Monthly Notices, 30-135, Lieut. Herschel of Bangalore, India, reported that, for two days (Oct. 17 and 18, 1870), dark bodies passed across the sun in a continuous stream, “varying in size and velocity.” The lieutenant explains, “As it was, the continuous flight, for two whole days, in such numbers, in the upper regions of the air, of beasts that left no stragglers, is a wonder of natural history, if not of astronomy.” When focusing, he saw “either wings or phantom-like appendages.” As he watched, one of them paused, hovered, then whisked off. The lieutenant decided, “There was no longer doubt: they were locusts or flies of some sort.”

Fort notes that “If locusts fly high, they freeze and fall in thousands,” as noted in Nature, 47-581.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, pp222-223 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).