Moon marks

On Jan. 31, 1915, six or seven white spots were observed on the moon in Littrow, arranged like the Greek letter gamma, according to Eng. Mec., 101-47.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p519 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

The new prophet who had appeared upon the moon

Strange changes were reported to an isolated object in the eastern part of the moon’s Mare Serenitatis, known as Linne. Before October 1866, Linne was well-known as a dark object. On Dec. 14, 16, 25 and 27 of 1866, Linne was seen as a white spot. “But,” Fort writes, “there was something that had the seeming more of a design, or of a pattern, an elaboration upon the mere turning to white of something that had been black.” Sunlight seemed to have nothing to do with its changing appearance. (The Student, 1-261; Rept. B. A., 1867-22)

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p. 428 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Luminous point on the moon

L’Astro., 11-33, reported that M. d’Adjuda of the Observatory of Lisbon saw “‘a very distinct, luminous point’” on the moon in Aristarchus on Nov. 7, 1891. It was also seen previously on May 7, 1867.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p466 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Taking up the subject theologically

The astronomer Schmidt reported that, on October 16, 1866, the isolated object on the moon called Linne, in the eastern part of the Mare Sereniatatis, hitherto a dark object, was becoming whiter.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p427 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Dark part of the moon

Someone named Gruithuisen reported, in Sci. Amer. Sup., 7-2712, that at 5 a.m. on Oct. 20, 1824, a light was seen upon the dark part of the moon. It disappeared, and six minutes later it reappeared. It disappeared again, then flashed intermittently until 5:30 a.m., when sunrise ended the observations.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p395 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).