I like best the super wolves

I like best the super-wolves that were seen to cross the sun during the earthquake at Palermo.

They howled.

Or the loves of the worlds. The call they feel for one another. They try to move closer and howl when they get there.

The howls of the planets.

I have discovered a new unintelligibility.

Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 242 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

I don’t know to just what degree

I don’t know to just what degree my accusation, in these matters, is of the laziness and feeble-mindedness of scientists. Or, instead of accusing, I am simply pointing out everybody’s inability seriously to spend time upon something which, according to his preconceptions, is nonsense. Scientists, in matters of our data, have been like somebody in Europe, before the year 1492, hearing stories of lands to the west, going out on the ocean for an hour or so, in a row-boat, and then saying, whether exactly in these words, or not: “Oh, hell! there ain’t no America.”

Charles Fort, Lo!, p. 625 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Peasants believed in meteorites

Peasants believed in meteorites.
Scientists excluded meteorites.
Peasants believe in “thunderstones.”
Scientists exclude “thunderstones.”
It is useless to argue that peasants are out in the fields, and that scientists are shut up in laboratories and lecture rooms. We cannot take for a real base that, as to phenomena with which they are more familiar, peasants are more likely to be right than are scientists: a host of biologic and meteorologic fallacies of peasants rises against us.

Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 101-102 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

This is a common reflex

This is a common reflext with the exclusionists: that substances not “truly meteoritic” did not fall from the sky, but were picked up by “truly meteoritic” things, of course only on their surfaces, by impact with this earth.

Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 74 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Rancidness

Rancidness–putridity–decomposition–a note that has been struck many times. In a positive sense, of course, nothing means anything, or every meaning is continuous with all other meanings; or that all evidences of guilt, for instance, are just as good evidences of innocence–but this condition seems to mean–things lying around among the stars a long time. Horrible disaster in the time of Julius Caesar; remains from it not reaching this earth till the time of the Bishop of Cloyne…

Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 66 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).